Stop The Childhood Obesity Madness

Taken from real life blog

Alright moms, I’m going to try not to get on an enormous soapbox here.  I’m just going to point out the MADNESS that is going on right now with our nation’s “Childhood Obesity” obsession, and we can discuss in the comments.

Child on ScaleAre there obese children? Sure. (mainly older children, after they learn bad habits)

Does obesity have health risks? Of course.

Do we need to talk to children about healthy choices, exercise, eating when they’re hungry and stopping when they’re not? By. All. Means.

But where do we stop? Weighing and measuring every school child’s Body Mass Index (BMI) in school, and issuing a report to the parents of the “obese” children?  By the way, the definition of obese has been tampered with, I believe, to make the levels lower, resulting in more “obese” children, which are not really obese.  More children that, of course,  the state has to “help”with their programs.  I’ve seen it with my own eyes, with my friends’ children.

Apparently, lead researcher Brian Moss, a sociologist at Wayne State University in Detroit would have us believe that 1/3 of 9-month-old babies… yes, you heard that right… BABIES… are obese.  Let me say that again.  Babies are obese.

Stephanie Pappas, of LiveScience.com (via Yahoo) writes:

The path toward obesity starts at a young age – even before babies transition to a solid diet, according to a new study.

Almost one-third of 9-month-olds are obese or overweight, as are 34 percent of 2-year-olds, according to the research, which looked at a nationally representative sample of children born in 2001. The study is one of the first to measure weight in the same group of very young children over time, said lead researcher Brian Moss, a sociologist at Wayne State University in Detroit. The results showed that starting out heavy puts kids on a trajectory to stay that way.

“If you were overweight at nine months old, it really kind of sets the stage for you to remain overweight at two years,” Moss told LiveScience.

 

To continue reading, click HERE.

 

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